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1 




OF TO-DAY 



Its principal Cities and Towns *&<&&<£ 
Protective and commercial ability^ <£•<£<£ 
Financial and trade resources ^g «g *£*£«£ «g 

Historical and Descriptive <£*£<£«£*£«£<& 



Edited by .* » J* J» 
G. W. LAMPKINS 
cf The Foster Press 
Chicago J* J* -."* ■< » 



Issued by the Kentucky Division of the 

Travelers Protective Association of America 

1896 



LOUISVILLE 



f 



H' 



Bedioa 




torical and descriptive 



position of its people, respflctfully inscribed by the 









Kentucky Division of the 

Travelers Protective Association 

of America 






INTRODUCTORY TO 



Kentucky of To-Bay 



/[nb Her Sre^t ©ities and Towns 




N presenting sketches of the more prominent 
cities of Kentucky it is appropriate to intro- 
duce the work with a brief general review 
of that magnificent State. At the com- 
mencement of the present century its 
deep rich soils were unbroken by the 
husbandman, but like a giant in repose, they 
were gathering strength for the mighty 
efforts of production to feed and clothe the intelligent and 
enterprising millions that were to inhabit the great Southern 
States. 

Its historical features are also of interest. The ad- 
venturous backwoodsmen of North Carolina were the pio- 
neers who led the way for the actual establishment of homes 
and families in Kentucky. 

There had been previous journeying through that region 
by Frenchmen, Englishmen, Americans, and probably Span- 
iards, but it was not until John Findlay, a North Carolinian, 
en >ssed the upper waters of the Tennessee, and, being led by 
abundance of game, advanced into the new country beyond 
the Cumberland Mountains, that the settlement of Kentucky 
began. Returning, he so fired the enthusiasm of Daniel 
Boone, that in May, 1769. with a company of five comrades 
(under the guidance of Findlay), Boone left his family at 
his home on the Yadkin River, crossed the mountains, and 
by June pitched his camp on the Red River, a branch of the 
Kentucky, within the present county of Morgan. With the 
exception of Boone, who was afterward joined by another 
brother, the members of the original party were either killed 
by the Indians or returned to North Carolina. Within two 
years, the intrepid Kentucky pioneer wandered over much of 
the present State, and then returned to his home in order to 
sell his farm and remove beyond the Cumberlands. 

Mewas not prepared to take up his adventures again for 
two -years. In 1774, Governor Dunmore, of Virginia, dis- 
patched him to his western wilderness to conduct out of it a 
party of surveyors who had ascended the Kentucky, and 



were in danger of being massacred by the Indians. Boone 
reached the party in June, 1774, while they were surveying 
Harrodsburg (now in Mercer County), the first settlement in 
Kentucky. 

Soon afterward Judge Richard Henderson, of North 
Carolina, organized the Transylvania Company, and with 
the assistance of Boone negotiated a treaty with the Chero- 
kees, by which the country between the Ohio, Kentucky and 
Cumberland rivers was ceded to them for $50,000. 

Boone at once proceeded to pave the way for planting 
settlements between and along the Tennessee and Kentucky 
rivers. In April, 1775, he laid out Boonsborough, Madison 
County, to which place he removed his family, his wife and 
daughters being the first white women to stand on the banks 
of the Kentucky. 

In 1789, the Legislature of Virginia passed an act con- 
senting that the district of Kentucky, which formed a part of 
that commonwealth, should be erected into an independent 
State. This act was formally accepted by Kentucky in July, 
1790. The Congressional Act admitting it into the Union 
took effect June 1, 1792. 

Kentucky has had four constitutions — those of 1792, 
1800, 1850, and 1891 — the fourth constitution was adopted, in 
convention, on April 11, 1891, and was ratified in the sum- 
mer of that year. 

From the Ohio river to the Cumberland, through the 
range of eastern counties, extending from Oldham to Mason, 
lies the famous blue-grass country, composed of lands which 
rest upon limestone, and give nutritious pasturage to noble 
horses and cattle. In the value of horses, Kentucky now 
stands fourteenth among the States, the figures being $29- 
346,000. According to the latest statistics, the leading crop, 
corn, is valued at over $31,000,000. Next comes tobacco, one 
of the great products of the State, the average annual value 
of the yield for the last nine years having exceeded $15,000,- 
000. the crops of 1890 amounted to over 166,000,000 pounds; 
the hemp crop to 12,000,000. 




LOUISVILLE 



THE FAUUS CITY 



HE largest and most important city in 
Kentucky, and the second in size on the 
•>#' ( )hio river, is situated in latitude 38deg., 
25 min. north; longitude 8s deg., 40 min., 
30 seconds west, and is distant 956 miles 
from New York, 1.034 from Boston, 794 from 
Washington, 482 from Pittsburg, 537 from Buf- 
falo, 377 from Detroit, 323 from St. Louis, 305 
from Chicago, and no each from Cincinnati 
and Indianapolis. The land about the Falls of 
the Ohio was surveyed as early as 1 770. but the 
first settlement was made in 1773. wnen Capt. 
Thomas Bullitt led an exploring party to this 
point, establishing a camp at the mouth of 
Beargrass Creek, then at the foot of what is 
now Third St. No attempt was made to further 
settle the place until 1778. when the memorable expedition of 
Gen. George Rogers Clarke, acting under the authority of 
the Legislature of Virginia, was made. Gen. Clarke de- 
scended the river with 300 men for the purpose of reducing 
British possessions in this section of the country. It is re- 
lated that in order to deceive the enemy he landed his troops 
on an island opposite the present City of Louisville, and had 
the ground cleared in order to enable six families, viz.: those 
, f fames Patton, R. Gheno with, John Tuel, Wm. Fait and J. 



McManness, who accompanied the expedition, to plant com 
thereon, which they did that year with the feigned view of set- 
tling the country, and thus allay any suspicion relative to the 
ultimate object of Gen. Clarke. 

It is probable that Corn Island, then a v ast area covered 
with dense forest, which the waters have since gradually 
carried away by their action, until in tune, of high water no 
trace is left of the spot made sacred as the habitation ot ( .en. 
Clarke and his brave comrades, received its name Irom tin- 
purpose for which the land was first cleared. 

Nothing has done more to advance the growth and pros- 
perity of our city than the locomotive. Our people were 
among the earliest to see the incalculable benefit to be de- 
rived, and to anticipate their future power in the world. Pre- 
vious to the war her success was owing largely to her position 
on one of the largest waterways in the world, but since that 
time it is along the iron tracks that prosperity has come into 
the city. 

In the number and importance of our railroads the town 
is especially favored, several of the largest systems in the 
country have termini here and we are in direct, quick and 
cheap communication with every part of the continent. The 
presence of competing lines enables our merchants to secure 
the advantage of very cheap freight rates. 




II 



LOUISVILLE 



The Louisville Southern was chartered in 1868. The 
main line was completed and opened May 16, 1888. It runs 
through the famous Bluegrass region, the richest land in the 
world. The road after passing through various hands was 
absorbed during the present year by the vast system known 
as the Southern Railway Company. 

The Chesapeak, Ohio & Southwestern is Louisville's 
other outlet to the South, 
via Paducah and Memphis. 

It is of the greatest import- 
ance as a competing line to 

the Louisville & Nashville 

railroad, which company is 

now contesting with the 

Illinois Central in the courts 

for its possession. 
T h e Louisville, Evans- 

ville ik St. Louis, known as 

the "Air Line," offers the 

shortest route to St. Louis 

and the Southwest. It passes 

through a rich territory and 

greatly enlarges the city's 

facilities for trade. 

The Louisville, New Al- 
bany & Chicago is a direct line through to Chicago and all 

points in Indiana and the Northwest. 

The Louisville, St. Louis & Texas runs parallel with the 
river to Henderson, Owensboro, and on to St. Louis, making 
competition with the steamboats. 

The Baltimore, Ohio & Southwestern is the quickest 




FOURTH AVENUE AND JEFFERSON si'RKKI 



route to Cincinnati, and is another outlet to the North. 
An important addition is made during the present year 
to the number of our railroads, by the arrival of the Cleve- 
land, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis, which comes into 
Louisville over the new Louisville and Jeffersonville bridge. 
This is one of the greatest railroad systems in the world and 
will be a great factor in the city's future development and 

progress. 

MANUFACTURING INTERESTS 

Manufacturing establish- 
ments numbering 1 ,700, with 
a combined capital of $36,- 
086,985, employing 27,198 
hands, paying wages 
amounting to $12,372,871, 
and turning out annually 
products valued at $54,5 15,- 
226. 

Louisville is the greatest 
whisky mart of the world. 
The name and reputation of 
Kentucky whiskies are of 
world-wide celebrity, and 
in no district of the habit- 
able globe has the accom- 
plishment of making fine whiskies reached a standard as 
high as that generally recognized as belonging to Kentucky. 

The Fifth Internal Revenue District of Kentucky, which 
includes this (Jefferson) and adjacent counties, is one of the 
most important in the United States as regards quantity, 
quality, and uniformity in the grade of whiskies produced, 



IKING WEST ON JEFFERSON 



12. 




ONLY 



NIGHT'S 
RIDE 

BETWEEN 



Louisville ilflemphis 



LIHITED TRAINS 

NEW AND MODERN EQUIPMENT 

THE ONL\ LINE with schedules arranged to accommodate the 
needs of commercial and other travel, between Louisville and Mem- 
phis, desiring to leave either point at the close of one day and arrive at 
the other on the opening of the next. 



THE BEST LINE BETWEEN 

Gioeionati aod Memphis 

Rates, Time-Tables, and further confirmation of above furnished at the 

following places: 

LOUISVILLE, KY.,No.230 Fourth Avenue 

C. R. RYAN, Passenger and Ticket Agent 

MEMPHIS, TENN., No. 303 Main Street 

W. J. HcBRlDE, District Pass, and Ticket Agt. 

J NO. ECHOLS, Qen-, Mg r. S . Q . „ ATCH , Qen , Pas , AgL 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 






ij 



Louisville & Nashville 

RAILROAD 

THE STEEL RAIL AND STONE 
BALLASTED 



ITS OWN RAILS BETWEEN 
THE CITIES OF 

CINCINNATI 

LEXINGTON 

LOUISVILLE 

NASHVILLE 

BIRMINGHAM 

PENSACOLA 




ST. LOUIS 

EVANSVILLE 

MEMPHIS 

MONTGOMERY 

MOBILE 

NEW ORLEANS 



SOLID TRAINS OF 



Pullman Sleeping Cars, Elegant Day Coaches 

Commodious 
Baggage Cars 



RUN THROUGH BETWEEN NORTHERN AND 
SOUTHERN TERMINALS. 

Y. VAN DEN BERG, Traffic Manager. C. P. ATMORE, Gen'l 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Pass. Agt. 



LOUISVILLE 



and in the amount of tax paid into the treasury of the gen- 
eral government on this class of manufacture. 

The manufacture of whisky is a Kentucky industry. The 
fine whiskies which are made and sold in Louisville, and dis- 
tributed from here, have their reputation and are sought for 
as Kentucky whiskies, and not as Louisville whiskies. Ken- 
tucky whisky belongs among the finer beverages, and should 
no more be classed with spirits than are cognacs and rums. 
Like all finer beverages, whiskies are known and ranked by 
their brands. All Kentucky whiskies have a distinctive po- 
sition in the trade, but the care, skill and good management 
of manufacturers have secured a special reputation and favor 
for the product of particular distilleries, without reference to 
the particular locality within the State in which they are 
situated. 

There is invested in distilling property in Kentucky more 
than $6,000,000. Apart from the revenue which the State and 
nation derive from this vast property and its product many 
thousands of our citizens are furnished with profitable em- 
ployment at remunerative wages through its agency. A large 
distillery furnishes a market for corn, rye, malt, staves, hoop- 
iron, cattle, hay, straw and labor. The grain from which the 
alcohol has been extracted furnishes food for many thousand 
cattle. The crop of a year of full production requires over 
300,000 barrels, costing over $600,000, and employing hun- 
dreds of coopers. The distilleries are large consumers of 
coal, and a conservative estimate puts the amount used by 
them annually at something over 2,000,000 bushels, which 
largely come from Kentucky mines. The transportation of 
these immense stocks of whisky, together with that of the 
raw material entering into its production and necessary for 
its manufacture and handling, furnishes a valuable tonnage 



to our transportation lines. Whisky is one of the most im- 
portant freight articles on some roads out of Louisville, and 
the contributions it pays for the support of the railroad sys- 
tem help to relieve the rates on wheat, corn, lumber, etc. • 

There are 309 registered grain distilleries in Kentucky, 
about 200 of which operate more or less each year, giving 
direct employment to about 2,000 men. When are added to 
them those employed in mining coal, getting out staves, mak- 
ing barrels and shipping whisky, the importance of this in- 
dustry to our State will be readily appreciated. To make 
this industry more valuable it is permanent. The peculiar 
character of the water of this State is maintained by all dis- 
tillers to have a great influence in establishing the qualities 
of the whisky produced here. The nature of the climate, 
varied but not extreme, is also a potent influence. The same 
processes and same material used away from Kentucky air 
and Kentucky water does not produce the same whisky. 

The cure necessary in the manufacture of choice Ken- 
tucky whisky, involving as it does the providing of expensive 
plants, keeping all parts of the establishment clean and 
sweet and selecting the choicest and soundest grain, makes 
it an expensive product, and gives it a high intrinsic value. 
The high revenue tax is not so out of proportion in the case 
of fine whisky as it is in the case of high wines. The plants 
for the manufacture of high wines and other commercial 
grades of distilled spirits are not nearly so expensive as those 
of whisky makers. The product of high wine distilleries 
and distilling establishments is ready for the market as sooi 
as it comes from the still, while whiskies intended for bev- 
erages are not usable for a year, not fairly merchantable 
under three years, and improve in excellence and value every 
year. All of these facts together make attempts on the part 



'4 



INCORPORATED 1875 



Louisville 

Manufacturing 
Co. 



WM. BENNETT 

President 




riANUFACTURERS OF 



FURNITURE 



FACTORY 29TH STREET 
CHESTNUT 

TO MADISON OFFICE AND SALESROOM 

605 WEST 
MAIN STREET 



Factory on line of Belt Railroad 
Connecting with all Railroads 
entering the City 



Louisville, Ky. 



W.T. Pyne 

Mill and Supply 
Co. 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



Iron Towers 

SMOKE STACKS AND 
SHEET-IRON WORK 
IRON AND STEEL TANKS 
Round and Square 



Wood Tanks 
and Vats 



DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



Mill and Factory 
Supplies 



Also builders of a larjje number of 
Celebrated 
Kentucky 
Distilleries 



PRICES QUOTED AND CORRESPONDENCE 
SOLICITED 



1301 TO 1319 W. MAIM ST. 



Cut represents ||lir 4' ' oot tower 
and 6,coo gallon tank 

Louisville, Ky. 



'5 



LOUISVILLE 



of whisky makers to defraud the government very unlikely. 
As a matter of historical fact the great frauds upon the rev- 
enue have been perpetrated by the highwine makers and the 
rectifiers. 

PRODUCTION OF KENTUCKY WHISKY. 
The following table, compiled from the records of the 
Internal Revenue offices, give the production of Kentucky 
whisky, 1863 to 1894 inclusive : 

Total gallons 
1 863 to 1868 3,593,79 1 

1868 to 1869 7,018,806 

1869 to 1870 1 1,082,082 

1870 to 1 87 1 5,870,002 

1871 to 1872 5,203,071 

1872 to 1873 5,244,663 

1873 to 1874 6,982,709 

1874 to 1875 9.399,338 

1875 to 1876 6,245,717 

1876 to 1877 7,889,151 

1877 to 1878 6,371,964 

1878 to 1879 8,111,781 

1879 to 1880 15,01 1,279 

1880 to 1881 31,869.047 

1881 to 1882 30,386,047 

1882 to 1883 9,900,676 

1883 to 1884 10,409,551 



Total gallons 

1884 to 1885 13458,995 

1885 to 1886 *iq,3i8,8iq 

1886 to 1887 17,015,034 

1887 to 1888 7,463,609 

1888 to 1889 21,960,748 

1889 to 1890 36,189,378 

1890 to 1891 33,393,045 

1891 to 1892 33,200,000 

1892 to 1893 • ■ • 45,366.470 

1893 to 1894 "... 20,132,803 

These figures are estimated on the fiscal year ending 

June 30th. 

KENTUCKY JEANS. 

Among the great industries which bring Louisville promi- 
nently to the front as a manufacturing center is the produc- 
tion of jeans. The trade in Kentucky jeans extends all over 
tlie United States and is increasing each year. There are at 
present located here fixe immense factories, giving employ- 
ment to a large number of hands. In this line Louisville is 
in a position to successfully compete with the rival establish- 
ments of any center in the country. The clothing business 
in this city has been making considerable progress, and if the 
same increase continues will enable us to compete with all 
comers; the city is steadily going to the front and is now 
recognized as one of the best markets to place orders. 




J 



LOUISVILLE 



FORTY YEARS' RECORD 



H- McKENMA 



DISTILLER OF 



NELSON COUNTY PURE OLD LINE 

50UR MASH 
WHISKY 

FAIRFIELD, NELSON COUNTY, KY. 



ESTABLISHED 1844 



TELEPHONE 1269 



OLD BLUE HOUSE 

R.G.SHANLEY 




DEALER IN 



FINE OLD LIQUORS FOR FAMILY PURPOSES 

245 FOURTH AVENUE 



H.McKENNAS WHISKIES 
A SPECIALTY 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



CO. 




"OLD TIMES" whisky received Highest Award Medal 
and Diploma for all ages over all Kentucky whiskies, Sept. 
5, 1893. Awarded by World's Columbian Exposition Jury 
of Awards, consisting of the leading experts of all nations, 
assisted by United States Government Chemists, awarding 
the magnificent score of 98.17 points out of a possible 100. 
The distillery, as it appeared at the World's Eair, is 
now located at Twenty-eighth and Broadway. It is in 
operation, and the public are cordially invited to visit 
same and see how " Old Times'' whisky was made one 
hundred years ago and up to the present time. 

Eighteenth and Main, and Green Street electric cars 
marked "Parkland" pass the distillery every few minutes. 



fcOUISWIfclrB 



KENTUCKY 




'7 



LOUISVILLE 



GEOGRAPHICAL ADVANTAGES 



Geographical position and manufacturing advantages are 

necessarily so homogeneous in the progress as well as in the 
birth of a great manufacturing community, that in the sub- 
ject-matter of this volume these two requisites are combined 
in their exposition as they naturally are in their power. I ,ouis- 
ville combines more geographical advantages of position than 
almost any city in the Union, bearing the same commercial 
relation to the new South as Chicago does to the new North- 
west, with this important difference, viz.: in addition to her 
extensive railroad connections she has an advantage that 
cannot be overestimated in the noble river that, Mowing at 
her feet and capable of bearing the traffic of a nation, 
mingles its waters with those of the majestic Mississippi, and 
thus through that great artery and its tributaries, brings to 
our doors the rich products of the vast regions that border 
the Upper and Lower Mississippi, the St. Francis, the White, 
Black, Arkansas, Yazoo, Anochita, Red, and many other 
navigable water-courses. Can there, therefore, be any doubt 
of the future of the Falls City as a commercial and shipping 
as well as a manufacturing point ? The contemplated im- 
provement of the rivers may for a brief time be delayed, but 
the very necessities of the country will force the expenditure 
of the ready money requisite to render this great highway of 
transportation all that it can be made, and which its location 
to producing and consuming populations of the country indi- 
cate it must be. Not only will the increasing wants of the 
people for cheap transportation require this, but the steadily 
growing bulks requiring transportation will render it neces- 
sary, and such improvements of the navigation of all con- 
necting rivers, as will make most available to those points 



this system of inland navigation, without a parallel in any 
nation or any country. Again, for the carrying on of manu- 
factures of great magnitude and variety Louisville is not 
excelled in natural advantages, and in the means for building 
up large and successful establishments by any of the most, 
favored of the other cities of the continent. It would not be 
possible within the limits of a single volume to give in detail 
all the facts in connection with the manufacturing operations 
conducted in Louisville. Suffice it to say whisky and tobacco 
are the leading products of Louisville; yet vast quantities of 
agricultural implements, vehicles of all kinds, leather, textile 
fabrics, boots and shoes, cements, steam-engines, machinery, 
architectural iron-work, stoves, tin and sheet-iron ware, sash, 
furniture, doors and blinds, cooperage, etc., add to the volume 
of her industries. To put the matter briefly, it may be tersely 
stated that Louisville is the largest tobacco market in the 
world; it makes and ships more cement than any city in the 
United States; it makes more oak-tanned leather than any 
city in the United States; it makes more plows than any city 
in the world; it makes more jeans than any other city; and 
last, but not least, it handles more fine whisky than any other 
market in the United States. 

THE TORNADO OF 1890 
This great calamity which visited Louisville on the even- 
ing of March 27th, 1800, is of historical importance. A heavy 
rainstorm began before eight o'clock, followed by hail and 
severe lightning. The wind then rose and at 8:30 p. m. the 
tornado struck the city, ploughed its way through in a few 
minutes, and in its brief time wrought terrible havoc and 
disaster. The storm approached Louisville from a south- 
westerly direction, crossing to Jeffersonville, damaging the 




_iiL 



l.OinSYILI.H 



THE 

5CHAEFER-MEYER 
BREWING 
CO. _^ 






LOGAN AMD LAMPTON 
STREETS 




LOUISVILLE, KY 



FRANK FEHR BREWING CO 

BREWERS AND BOTTLERS 



OF 



F.F.X.L.and Lager Beer 




We challenge the world to produce a purer 
or better article 

420 to 446 E. GREEN and 420 to 440 MARSHALL 
Bottling: Works, 441-443 E. Green 



JOHN F. KELLNER, President 

CHAS. P. DEHLER, Secretary 



J. GEO. RUCKSTUHL. Vice President 
FRANK FEHR. Manager 



TELEPHONES 

Office— 856 and 1919 Bottling Department 467 

Branch, 20th and Grayson — 505 



'9 



LOUISVILLE 



front of that city greatly; thence recrossing the river and de- 
stroying the standpipe of the water-works, about three- miles 
east of where it first struck the river. The path of the storm 
through the portion of the city visited was from six hundred 
to eight hundred yards wide, and in its passage it killed out- 
right seventy-six persons, and injured over two hundred 
more. It destroyed partially, and in some cases totally, five 
churchc-s, one railroad depot ( Union ),two public halls, three 
school buildings, two hundred and sixty-six stores, thirty-two 
manufacturing establishments, ten tobacco warehouses, and 
five hundred and thirty-two residences. The pecuniary loss 
by storm was, after careful calculation, estimated at $2,150,- 
000. The calamity aroused the sympathy of the country, and 
pecuniary assistances for the relief of the suffering it caused 
was freely tendered; but Louisville felt aide to attend to her 
own stricken ones, and the offers were thankfully and grate- 
fully declined. Something over $15,000 was sent in a way 
that could not be refused, but that amount and about $1,000 
more was spent in relieving suffering outside the territory of 
the city. The citizens contributed over $115,000, besides 
clothing, bedding, and food, and with these means, through 
the admirable system pursued by the Board of Trade Relief 
Committee, food, shelter, medical attention and burial ex- 
penses were promptly provided and distress from want pre- 
vented, and the losses of the poor, including the rebuilding 
of three hundred and eleven homes and their wreckage of 
furniture, made good. The faithful and successful work of 
this committee of relief is worthy of, and has justly received, 
the highest praise. The destruction of the standpipe at the 
water-works threatened a water famine, which would have 
caused many factories to shut down and thrown many peo- 
ple out of employment, and seriously affected the health of 



the city, but this danger was happily averted by the energy 
of the Water Company and the skill of its engineer. For a 
month or more a large number of her pushing business men 
were occupied with relieving the distress, removing the wreck 
and rebuilding necessitated by the tornado, and consequently 
in some departments the business of the city was neglected 
and fell off. 

PROMINENT BUILDINGS 

The erection of large buildings of every description is 
continually going on in Louisville, and from present pros- 
pects seems to be destined to be as actively pushed in the 
future, as in the past. 

Prior to the year 1885, there was considerable opposition 
to the new style of structures called "sky-scrapers" but with 
the spread of more general information regarding the thor- 
oughly fire proof manner in which they were built through- 
out, and the increased strength which was obtained by the 
use of iron and steel, this soon disappeared. Louisville today 
contains many fine examples of many-storied buildings, and 
as excessive height has never been attempted, the architec- 
tural effect is much enhanced. 

THE CITY WATER SUPPLY 
Louisville is supplied with water by the Louisville Water 
Company, which, though distinct from the municipal corpora- 
tion, is almost a city department, Louisville owning $1,274,- 
600 of stock, the total stock amounting to $1,275,100, conse- 
quently the officers are answerable to the city as the principal 
stock holder. The water is obtained from the Ohio four miles 
above the city, and pumped into two reservoirs, having a 
capacity of 100,000,000 gallons, 179 feet above the low-water 
mark of the river. The works were completed in 1879 and 



DRUMMERS FAVORITE 



1 < U'lSYIU.H 



FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 
AND JOBBERS 



ALWAYS MEMTIOM 



KB-flE' 



TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 
BOYS 
WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS 




"KIS=ME 

CHEWING GUM 



" 



" Da Kis- me, dear," 
The youth Insisted. 

As 'round her weld 
One arm h ; twL>teo. 

" I will," siic laughed, 

" If you'li ■ 
To get some ' KIs-Me 

Gum for roe 

KIS-ME GUM CO. 

Louisville, ky 



SIX FLAVORS 

IN EACH CARTON 



SIX CAKES FOR 
5 CENTS 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 



JOHN CUDAHY, President 

Chicago, 111. 



W. 1'. CLANCY, V-Prest., Treas. and Gen'l Mj 
Louisville. Kv. 



ALEX. HUNTER. Ass't Secy. 
Louisville, Ky. 



Louisville Packing 6o. 



INCORPORATED 



PACKERS 

CURERS OF 

MAGNOLIA- 
BRAND 
OF MEATS 



Louisville, Ky. 



H. F. Vissman & Co. 



CURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 



"DERBY HAM" 

BREAKFAST BACON ^£ SHOULDERS 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KIMDS 
OF SAUSAGE 

STRICTLY PURE LEAF LARD, DRIED BEEF 



PACKING HOUSE 

417 to 433 BICKEL AVENUE 



BRANCH HOUSE, 338 2nd STREET 



LOUISVILLE, KY 



i.ouis\ 

and have cost altogether about $6,000,000, the annual receipts 
for water supply amounting to about $330,000, while the ex- 
penses for conducting the works aggregate $70,000 yearly. 

BANKING AND FINANCE 

Louisville stands out in strong contrast to other Western 
and Southern cities, as regards all matters connected with 
modern banking and finance, and no city in the United States 
can point to such an unabated and uniform prosperity as the 
ban kin-- institutions of the Falls City during the present gen- 
eration. A large part of the South is entirely dependent upon 
her for banking facilities, and during the financial crisis of 
the past lew years, merchants, manufacturers and financiers 
have not relied on Louisville in vain. Managed with rare 
fidelity and sagacity, no spirit of speculation has shaken her 
banks and no defalcation has gutted their vaults. 

Louisville, as is well known, is a great center for loaning 
money to outside corporations, and few cities in the West or 
South have so much of their capital invested in property be- 
yond their limits as ours. 

• PLACES OF AMUSEMENT 

Louisville, which has for years had the reputation among 
theatrical managersof being an Ai " show town," supports a 
number of well-equipped, fir>t-class theatres and amusement 
halls, and they are largely patronized by the best class of 
people, citizens and strangers. The . plays presented in the 
theaters are generally of a high order of merit, and the prices 
of admission are reasonable. Each has a history of success 
or failure peculiarly its own ; and upon the boards of these 
houses of entertainment the greatest actors of the past and 
present, both of our own country and of Europe, have de- 



ILLE 

lighted thousands by their faithful representations of the dif- 
ferent phases of human life. 

THE COMMERCIAL CLUB 

The Commercial Club was organized in 1887 and has a 
membership of over thirteen hundred, representative busi- 
ness and professional men. It is not a social organization 
but a large merchantile army, that has for its object the 
advancement of the city's financial, commercial and manu- 
facturing prosperity. 

The club is made up of the younger business element of 
the city, and has achieved great success by bringing Louis- 
ville and Kentucky before the notice of the world by special 
undertakings and the dissemination of interesting and valu- 
able printed matter, which has advertised the city and 
attracted large capital and business here. 

Its various committees arc constantly introducing pro- 
jects for the good of the city and its citizens in a business 
way, and endeavor by entertainments and correspondence to 
attract new enterprises and thus further the prosperity and 
commerce of the city. The club has spacious quarters in the 
Board of Trade building. 

THE BOARD OF TRADE 

One of the most important organizations in Louisville is 
the Board of Trade, which was duly incorporated by the 
Legislature in 1873, and has ever aimed to assist not only the 
merchants and manufacturers of our city, but also the peo- 
ple of the city and state in all matters relating to business 
prosperity. Its policy has always been to advertise the 
advantages of Louisville as a trading point and aid our 
merchants in extending their business. The board often 



LOUTSVTLLR 



STITZEL BROTHER COMPANY 



DISTILLERS OP 



tine 

kentucky 
whiskies 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



ESTABLISHED i ft 75. 




A. Von Micheroux & Co. 



inPORTERS 



£>.18 Pulton St., Cor. Columb 
Heights 



i a 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



LOUISVILLE & EVAM5VILLE 
MAIL COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



STEAHERS 

Tell City, Rose Hite, E. J. Ragon and Tarascon 

Leaves Louisville daily except Sunday 
at 4 p. m. 

Leaves Evansville daily except Sunday and Monday 
at 6. p. m. Monday at io a. m. 



GENERAL OFFICES 

176-178 Fourth Avenue 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Kentucky River Packet and Towboat Co. 

INCORPORATED 




Hi 11 





Louisville, Frankfort, Tyrone and Shaker Ferry Packet 

J. I., s 1 All; Prest. and Uen'l Manager 
• 24-126 4th Street TELEPHONE 1067, RING 2 



33 



LOUIS VI 

brings to the city excursions of merchants from some 
locality, where our merchants have customers. It receives 
and entertains them at its own expense, affording them every 
opportunity for seeing that it would be advantageous for 
them to trade with us. It has a membership of over five 
hundred members, consisting of the leading wholesale and 
retail merchants, manufacturers and many belonging to the 
professions. 

In addition to the issuing, etc., of daily market prices, 
both local and at large, the care of transportation interests 
and other matters usual in boards of trade, it has a first-class 
reference and statistical library, which is extremely valuable 
to members and citizens. The board occupies offices in its 
own spacious building at Third and Main streets, where its 
large trade hall, having a seating capacity of six hundred, 
and also the committee rooms are located. 



RESIDENTIAL LOUISVILLE 

If Louisville possesses, as she certainly does, all the ad- 
vantages to which reference has been made, it will perforce 
be admitted that no element in the constitution of a great 
city is wanting. The capitalist who would invest money to 
advantage can here find a promising field for enterprise. 
There is also plenty of room for more manufacturing indus- 
tries. The man of leisure, with fixed income, may find in the 
Falls City, too, a delightful home, and live just as his means 
may allow, even to the enjoyment of luxury. The mechanic 
and tradesman can, by industry and economy, secure a com- 
fortable domicile on easy terms, and in Louisville every rea- 
sonable wish may be gratified, and the new settler find a wel- 
come to any class of society which may be congenial to his 
taste. The great problem of how and where to live never 



agitated so many minds as now. The pressure of a high 
civilization, the requirements of life under conditions of tense 
strain, the increasing impracticability, with rich and poor 
alike, of making both ends in^pt in what seem inevitable 
responsibilities and importunate demands, all combine to 
render the question a vital one. Many perplex themselves 
a while and then give up the conundrum. The capable work- 
man drifts into swarming tenement houses. The well-to-do 
organizers of business interests drop into boarding houses 
or hotels. The wealthy emigrate to Europe on indefinite 
tours and errands to escape the annoyance of unfaithful 
servants and the care of establishments. Young men take 
a practical view of the matter and omit to marry. Young 
women take advantage of the dilemma, educate themselves 
for doctors, teachers, lawyers, etc., and, very sensible, make 
royal and hospitable homes for themselves, welcoming whom 
and when they choose. But the little children of native-born 
American citizens become fewer and fewer, and children of 
the emigrant and alien outnumber the infant home-born sons 
and daughters of the republic. In considering how and 
where to live, there are growing indications that the 
native citizen is just perching like an uncertain bird of 
passage on the wing, or losing individuality in tene- 
ment house herds, hotel hives, and pleasure haunts. 
Growing more slowly and clinging more to traditions, 
Louisville enjoys many remarkable advantages as a resi- 
dence city for all classes, not the least of which is the 
taste, that has been characteristic from the first, in the beauti- 
fying and building of homes. The business quarter has 
always been plain, though the buildings have been equal to 
all the demands of an active commerce; while all who could 
build houses have made them as handsome as their means 



34 



J.E. 



MORAND, I'n«idc>ui 
DIRECTORS 



LOriSX'TIJ I 

HENRY KNIPPENBERG, Vice-President 



I'llll.ir I . [GOE, Sec'y and Treas. 



CHARLES H. GIBSON. I.nllisvill, 
R„BERT W. GKIGER ^ 

fAMESA.LEF.CH 

Louis Hite 

j. H. Lendenberger 

John H.Whali.ex 

John E. Morand 

John C. McCitcheon, Indianapolis 

Henry Knipi-enhekg 



Louisville Transfer Company 



HORE RUBBER TIRES THAN ANY CARRIAGE 
COMPANY IN AHERICA 



Cor. Ninth and Oreen Streets 



LOUISVILLE. KY., U.S. A. 



FDR SAI F BY ALL FIR5T " CLAS5 Old Kentucky Tobacco 



JOBBERS 
AND RETAILERS 



Weissinger's Special 
Burr Oak 
Hold Fast 



HARRY WEISSINGER T0BA6G0 GO. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



IRON, SLATE AND WOOD MANTELS 



HEATING AND COOKING STOVES 



Foreign and Domestic Tile for Floors 
Vestibules and Hearths 



SCRNLMN 5t COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS 



trass Goods, Fenders, Fire Sets, Andirons, Coal Hods 
Vases, Umbrella Stands, etc. 



SALESROOM, 438 WEST MAIN STREET 

Foundry, Work Shop and Office .. 20th and Portland Ave. 



Louisville, Ky. 



R.MANSFELD&SON 

STORE FIXTURE WORKS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



r 



Bank, Office, Store and Hotel Furniture- 
N °- 3I3 EAST MAIN STREET 



Fixtures, Show Cases, etc. 

L-OUISiZIL-L-©, KY. 



3S 



permitted. The great plain upon which the city was built, 
covering seventy square miles, and extending back six miles 
to the river, to a group of picturesque knolls or hills, has 
afforded every facility for the ecomomical gratification of 
taste. Ground being plentiful and level, distance was not 
difficult to overcome; and so, instead of being crowded into 
restricted limits set up by natural barriers, the city has spread 
at her own pleasure. The streets are broad, well-paved, 
drained, and beautified with a profusion of fine shade trees. 
There are few cities in the world with such finely shaded 
streets as Louisville possesses, and none where the streets arc 
wider. The residences are, as a rule, provided with spacious 
yards and gardens, and in the spring of the year a drive over 
the city past the miles of great enclosures filled with flowers 
and shrubbery, and under the shade of trees rich with foliage 
and blossoms, is like a trip to fairyland. It is simply the 
pride of home, united with good taste and a constant study of 
the most effective architecture, that has thus produced in 
Louisville a city of remarkable residential attractions. The 
resident, be he workman with hands or brain, may have his 
own home, made attainable by the large industries which are 
glad to exchange just coin for fair service, and truly has it 
been remarked by the talented authoress of " Home and 
Home Influences": "To the hard-worked man nothing af- 
fords greater relief, gives greater strength lor the daily 



LOUISVILLE 

struggle, than the ability in one moment to turn his back on 
the din and turmoil, and dust and confusion — the inevitable 
concomitants of busy quartets, — and from his ozen hillside cot- 
tage breathe the pure air of heaven." This acquisition is 
easily and economically attainable, even by the subordinate J 
artisan, in this same city of Louisville. And thus the man 
of wealth, the manufacturer and capitalist, seeking a home 
in the City of the Falls, finds his interests and the well-being 
and safety of society resting upon a sound, secure basis of 
well-conditioned labor. This, indeed, is Louisville's strong 
point, that her citizens, employer and employed, form a homo- 
geneous household, depending upon each other, and each 
controlling their own affairs. The people who make up this 
community are best estimated through the important public 
works, large and liberal charities, superior system of public 
schools they have so long fostered with special solicitude, the 
inestimable benefits of the religious privileges afforded by the 
main churches, the advantages of free libraries, art galleries, 
the most charming social circles— all these advantages in a 
setting of healthful climate and sanitary local influences, to-l 
gether with the oft-quoted business prospects and oppor- 
tunities of the city, make, as it were, a medle> of substantial 
attractions as a residence suited to the varied requirements of 
the multitudinous types of men and women in whose lives 
and business schemes there iseveran undertone of " Donum, 
delce domun." 



LOUISVILLE 






i rM .,HOHT.P«.'-'» l »'"" >M - 



J. MARSHALL, Secretary 



THE 

WESTERN TdNNINQ 
COflFflNT 

PURE OAK TANNED 

HARNESS LEATHER 



JrJr 



1327 to 1331 FIFTEENTH STREET 



LOUISVILLE, KV. 



Ill L.ttfeller^Sons 

WHOLESALE 
LIQUOR 

DEALERS 

Louisville, Ky. 



"O'l H.ICIts 



'"' TIIK WK1.I. KNO\*N IS11AX1 




()| ^ POTOMAC 
ROSE GLEN 

OLD EAGLE WHISKIES 



Hi.nuy Laur 



J. B. Hoi.lowav 



E. R. Hurley T. H. Garreti 



T. H. Garrett & Go. 



INCORPORATED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FROM 

Pure Kentucky 
Leaf 



SCOTCH SNUFF 




m<§ 



Office and Hills, 1209, 1211, 1213, 1215 W. Main St. 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



"TRY IT" 



"LIKE IT" 



USE NO OTHER" 



R. R. GLOVER, President 



W. H. MAY.Sec'y and 1 rcas 



Louisville Coffin Company 




HANUFACTLIRERS OF 



BURIAL CASES, CASKETS, SHROUDS, LININGS 
AND FUNERAL SUPPLIES 



Cor. Eleventh and flagazine Sts. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



?7 



Travelers Protective Association 



OF AMERICA 




HE influences leading up to the organiza- 
tion of The Travelers' Protective Asso- 
ciation were the direct outgrowth of 
America's grand and unexampled Indus- 
trial and Commercial systems. 

Within a half century these mighty forces 
of human exertion have shown a more rapid and 
tremendous development in the United States 
than elsewhere in the combined civilized world. 
Steam power ranks first in the progressive 
measurement of production and distribution, and 
its use in connection with machinery has more than doubled 
the working power of each individual in this country since 
1840, while the effective power of the people is three times 
greater than in i860. Two-thirds of our steam power is em- 
ployed in railway traffic, which is twice more than the com- 
bined railway traffic of the world outside of the United States. 
In a combination of hand, horse and steam power it is 
found that the I'nited States has a total energy equal to that 
of Great Britain, France and Germany united, while the ratio 
of energy in this country is twice greater to each inhabitant 
than in France and Germany and thirty per cent, more than 
in England. 

An ordinary American farm hand, with the employ- 
ment of improved machinery, raises as much grain as six 



men in Austria, five in Germany, four in France and three in 
England, 

Four men in this country can now produce as much 
Hour as will feed 1,000 persons for a month, with twelve 
ounces of bread for each one per day. 

These facts are taken from a late paper prepared by 
M. G. Mulhall, a distinguished English statistician, and are 
not therefore the imaginative product of an enthusiastic 
American, but simply illustrate the recognized power and 
extent of our commerce. 

Interwoven with these wondrous elements of produc- 
tion and distribution, are the vigorous energies of the imme- 
diate representatives of our manufacturers and merchants, 
comprising the commercial travelers of the country. 

In organizing an association for wise and beneficent 
objects, they have only followed the natural laws of protec- 
tion. They have concentrated a great power, that would 
otherwise be diversified, and become one of the most im- 
portant as well as efficient auxiliaries to commerce and trade 
that is known to civilization. 

Therefore the Travelers' Protective Association de- 
serves, as it has a right to claim, the encouragement and 
favorable consideration of every merchant, banker and 
manufacturer in the United States. 



38 



LOTISVILLI- 



ESTABLISHED 1848 



D. FRANTZ & SONS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




OAK 
SOLE 

LEATHER 



CORNER FRANKLIN AND 
BUCHANAN 

street LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Globe Tanning: Co. 






&SE.THE 

Harness leather 
hand stuffed 



Louisville, Kentucky 



A Hotel 



with our 




LIFE IS PREC IOUS. 

Have you the life of human 
beings in your care? If so, 
consider carefully the Kirker- 

Bender Fire Escape, which 

is nothing if not perfect. 
Once see it and you will say 
it is the only real Fire Escape 
in existence. The lame, blind, 
sick, women and children all 
come down through it with 
equal ease and safety. Write 
for further information. 

DOW&CO, 

*rn. Md Holt r. 8. Agti., 

LOUISVU LE. KY. 



Fire Escape 

is always the 
Headquarters of 
T. P. A. 

MEN. 

This escape is 
absolutely without a peer. 
Write us and let us tell you what people say 
who are using- them. 
Thousands have delighted to come down in them 



L. Richardson, President M. I). Stambach, V-Prestand Sec'y 

W. N. Henderson, Treas. and Manager 



Old Kentucky 
Woolen Mills 



Co 



Incorporated 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Fine Woolens, Worsteds and Kentucky 
Jeans 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



39 



What Has Been 

AGGOFnplishede^^e^ 

In conjunction with its mutual benefits The Travelers' 
Protective Association is secured by charter and founded upon 
beneficent and business principles that are stable and per- 
manent in character and therefore commands the respect and 
confidence of the country. 

Through its interposition it has secured from the I Inited 
States Supreme Court a decision against the constitutionality 
of the so-called "Drummers' License 
Tax," that was imposed by fifteen states, 
three territories and the District of Co- .;, 

lumbia. 

It has secured for its members bet- 
ter hotel accommodations and rates with 
the free privileges of sample rooms. 

From the St. Louis, Iron Mountain 
& Southern and "Cotton Belt" Railways 
it has secured for its members and other 
commercial travelers concessions of one- 
half cent per mile from regular rates, 
which involves a saving of at least $50,000 
per annum to commercial travelers. 

It has obtained the benefits of "week 
end tickets" at half rates from a large 
number of western railway companies. 

Through the direct influence of The Travelers' Protec- 
tive Association, the Congress of the United States passed 
an amendment to the Inter-State Commerce Act for the 
benefit of commercial travelers, by which railroad corpora- 
tions are authorized to issue 5,000-mile interchangeable 
tickets with the privileges of an excess of sample baggage 



g 



HERMAN I.. WEIL, 

President Kentucky Division Travelers' Protective 

Association. 



to commercial travelers. The officers of the Association are 
now in correspondence with a large number of railroad com- 
panies to effect the objects of that amendment, and the inter- 
changeable mileage has been secured through the territory 
of the Central Traffic Association, embracing Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Ohio, part of Michigan, Wisconsin, New York, Penn- 
sylvania, West Virginia and Kentucky, at two cents per mile, 
and by buying an interchangeable mileage 
book, commercial travelers can now travel 
oxer a system embracing an aggregate of 
nearly one hundred railroads. 

Again, the association provides a 
$5,000 accident insurance policy for each 
of its members. It has also established a 
weekly benefit of S25.00 in case of injury 
by accident, limited to a term of fifty-two 
weeks. 

The commercial traveler is recog- 
nized as the trusted and responsible agent 
of our mercantile and manufacturing es- 
tablishments. He goes forth to build up 
and maintain the great business operations 
of these enterprises. He directs the flow 
of a thousand streams of trade to a cen- 
tral point. He touches new fields of industry and they be- 
come sources of ^reat profit, lie is the commercial Moses, 
smiting the rock that production and trade may spring forth 
to freshen and gladden the land. 




50 



LOUTSYTLLE 





ARTHUR 
JONES 

Old Reliable 
Brass 
Founder 

ESTABLISHED 1873 

Brass and Copper 
Castings made to order 
on shortest notice 

COPPER BRANDS 
A SPECIALTY 

All work guaranteed to jjivc 
satisfaction 

an First Street 
near Main 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 




COUPES, CARRIAGES 
VICTORIAS 

TRAPS and 
SURREYS 



Baggage Transferred Promptly 



Best Service 
Lowest Prices 




Louisville Carriage, 60. 



•IOHN E. ROCHE 

President 



rplephone 

1600 



EIGHTH AND JErTERSON STS. 



t COLGANS 
k GUM 



mSa 



GOliGANS 

TaffyTolu Cum 



As ! 



-i&2 



IT IS MADE IN SIX DELICIOUS 
FLAVORS 

Tolu, Cinnamon, Orange 
Peppermint 
Pepsin, Licorice 

Our Pepsin Gum is made with Armour's 
high test Lactated Pepsin, and is un- 
equaled for Dyspepsia. 
The Cinnamon flavor is being prescribed 
largely by Dentists to preserve the teeth 
and sweeten the breath. 



Q 
< 

m 



V) 

- 

— 

I 

O 
fi 

T 

00 

"* 
1 

<C 

«T 

■a 
e 



m 
j 

j 



A GREAT SELLER. 
PERCENTAGE GOOD. 
THE ONLY LAXATIVE COUGH DROP 
ON THE MARKET 
THEREBY 

CURES COLDS 



x = II. A 



IU 



.CU5CADEN5 



M>q 



< I 




Rf^ 



^1 




m 



a* 



1*5 

o 



O 



FLAXSEED- LICORICE - HDARHOUMD g 



<5e 



«!' 



So simple that everybody 

wants them. 



o 

a. 



^istopical J)^ ^ 



:of fr\e= 



®[ ? i o av«Icr'§:-^potcc!iv«:-^5§§ocia!ioi] 







T a convention of representative commer- 
cial men, held at Denver, Colorado, in 
June, i8qo, The Travelers' Protective As- 
sociation of America emerged from a 
former organization 
that was incomplete in structure 
■ and ineffective in its operations. 
Resolute and able men were 
called upon to discharge the 
functions of office and complete 
the organic chart. Among these was Mr. 
George S. McGrew, of St. Louis, who was 
elected to serve as the first president of 
the Association. 

Hitherto organizations of this char- 
acter were local and limited in their influ- 
ences and operations, and that convention 
addressed itself to the work of nationalizing 
the Association. 

To that end the federal co-operative 
plan of organization was adopted, and 
subsequent experience has demonstrated its wisdom, both in 
the rapid growth and stability of the organization. 

That scheme of government was at once popular and 
effective because its foundation was the great principle of 




V 

FINIS E. LACK, 
Secretary- Treasurer Kentucky Division Travelers 
Protective Association 



community and independence, with a central or national 
authority, subdivisions corresponding with the several States 
and Territories, with local divisions or posts in the large cities 
and leading towns of the country. In each of these spheres 
of original authority there is harmonious 
co-operation and unwavering loyalty to 
the national organization. Such are the 
prominent features of the grand charter of 
The Travelers' Protective Association, 
which was organized under the general 
laws of Missouri, and became a legal and 
responsible body. Since that date its prog- 
ress has been onward and upward without 
interruption. 

The Second National Convention, held 
at Little Rock, Ark., in June, 1891, was a 
conspicuous occasion to celebrate a large 
increase in membership, with a surplus of 
nearly $7,000 in the treasury. Mr. McGrew 
was re-elected to the presidency for a sec- 
ond term. 

In June, 1892, the Third Annual Convention was held at 
Old Point Comfort, Va., at which the continued growth of the 
Association was reported, with a treasury surplus of about 
$14,000. Again, Mr. McGrew was elected president. 



LOUISVILLE 




BREAD 
BISCUITS 
CAKES 
CRACKERS 




TENTH AND MARKET STS. 



United States Bakii^^o. 

LOUISVILLE BAKERY 

LOUISVILLE, KY 



Largest and best equipped Bakery South 
of the Ohio River 



Turner, Day & Woolworth 
Manufacturing Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 



AXE, ADZE, PICK, SLEDGE 
HATCHET 

Hammer and Mining Tool Handles 



1818-1820 Seventh Street LOUISVILLE, KY..U.S.A. 



r^J^jT^i^ir^JSr^J^EJSJ^SrsrSJ^JSJSr^ErBfj 



JTt^Z--*^ , /Osm^i^ cc'-l' a^-&- At^4«>t^ c-ttu. /far- 

iJZi. -ft *^^r *Stzf <***-/" "f'-i^.c^ f, v -<->- as£J J tlf , 



*S ^?V^ >ttg^ ]?' 






:^_ 




i.O 



INCORPORATED 



StnJer Brothers Tokvcco 

Company 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

CM THE SQUARE'' AMD 
CUP GREEttVILE' 
PLUG TOBACCO 



-aag, gge e. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



5S 



LOUISVILLE 




The Fourth Annual Convention was held at Peoria, 111., 
in June, i8g 3) at which increased progress was reported, with a 
steadily enlarging- membership and a treasury surplus of 
$24,315. 

At that convention Mr. John A. Lee, of St. Louis, Mo., 
was elected to the presidency. 

•Milwaukee, Wis., was the beautiful and opulent city m 
which the Fifth Annual National Conven- 
tion was held, in June, 1894. It was an 
interesting occasion. The Association ex- 
hibited a continued growth in membership 
and a surplus in the treasury of #27,608. 
So efficient and able had been the admin- 
istration of Mr. Lee, that he was unani- 
mously re-elected to serve a second term 
in the presidency 

In the old and historic city of San 
Antonio,Texas,theSixth Annua, National 

Convention was held in June, 189s, and for ' v ' cretaryi ""' Treasnrer Pos < "»" '—svnie Divfe ion 
*e third term Mr. John A. Lee was re-elected to the pres^ ^ 
dency, a fitting recognition of his able and efficient services 
111 behalf of the Association. 

Terre I laute, Ind., was selected as the city for holding the 
convention on June 2d of the present year. 



The accompanying picture is a good likeness of Mr. 
A. II. Beckmann, the Secretary and Treasurer of Post " D " 
Louisville Division. T. P. A., and Secretary of the Kentucky 
Wholesale Grocers' Association. This earnest worker has 
been untiring in his efforts to bring into prominence the 
T.P.A.of A., and his articles on the interchangeable 5,000 
mileage ticket have frequently been published. While the 
Louisville Post is small in number of 
active members, it claims an honorary 
membership of eighteen of Louisville's 
staunch jobbing merchants, due to the 
efforts of Mr. Beckmann, who are using 
their best endeavors to promote the inter- 
ests of theT. P. A. of A. While Mr. Beck- 
mann is an ardent admirer of associations 
and organizations, his broad gauge is well 
illustrated in an article which appeared 
m a St. Louis Commercial paper under 
date of January n, 1896, on the subject 
of the boycott of the Southern Wholesale Grocers' Associa- 
tion vs. the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company. 




54 



LOUISVILLE 



GEO. H. ENQELHARD 



V. H. ENGELHARD 



A. ENGELHARD, Jr. 



HEIttEUinitM 50115 



JOBBERS OF 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 



Wholesale 

Grocers 

and Liquor Dealers 



80LE AGENTS FOR THE 

STATE OF KENTUCKY 

CARL UPMANN 

N£W YORK 

JOSE MORALES 4 CO. 

OCALA, FLA. 



CIGARS.. 

Louisville, Ky. 



D. C. BRENNER & CO. 




SEAL ENGRAVERS 



RUBBER 
STAMPS 
STENCILS 



BAGGAGE, BAR AND 
MINERS 



BRASS AND ALUMINUM f~* M P f^ V C ... ... 

STEEL DIES, BADGES, STENCIL, PAINT AND 
BRUSHES, BRASS SIGNS, ETC. 



\v. E. CALDWELL, Preslden 



II. B, WINTERSMITH, Sedretan 



TELEPHONE 1039-2 



W. I CALDWELL (D. 

INCORPORATED 

MANUFACTURERS OFALL KINDS 
AND SIZES OF 

TOWERS, TUBS AND TANKS 

CYPRESS TANKS 

A SPECIALTY 

ALSO BUILDERS OF IRON AND STEEL TANKS 

218-220 EAST MAIN STREET 

217-219 BROOK STREET LOUISVILLE, KY., U.S. fl. 






S^ 



EUROPEAN 
HOTEL 







1ESTAURANT 

' QORB^SMAINST 
LOUISVILLE, 




^®«®®®«®®«®®®^®e©< 



■54 



General Features 



^G 



of tb_e= 

•Travelers Protective Association 



Qualifcations for Membership 

An applicant for membership must be a white male per- 
son, of good moral character, not under 20 nor over 55 years 
of age, a commercial traveler, salesman or buyer, engaged 
in a legitimate wholesale or manufacturing business. 

Instructions to Applicants 

When desirous of dividing the amount due your benefi- 
ciary, you must do so in fractions, viz.: one-fifth, one-fourth, 
etc., as you may desire. 

The beneficiary's Christian name must be given in all 
cases. 

Applications for alterations or changes cannot be ac- 
cepted. 

Applications must be accompanied with $5.00 which pays 
the semi-annual dues, and a $2.00 entrance fee which is to be 
appropriated as follows: $1.00 to the indemnity fund, 50 cents 
to the State Division and 50 cents to the local post from 
which the application is made. 

The annual dues are $10.00, payable either annually or 
semi-annually, as the applicant may direct. $1.00 of which 
goes to the State Division; $1.00 to the Post: $2.00 to the 
Expense Fund, and $6.00 to the Benefit Fund. 



Objects of the Association 

1 st. To secure the repeal of all Municipal, County, State 
or Territorial laws imposing or forcing a license tax on com- 
mercial travelers. 

2d. To secure recognition from railroads as a profes- 
sion, obtain as favorable terms on transportation and bag- 
gage as are given to any other class of travelers, and to 
adjust all differences between railroads and commercial 
travelers on a fair, equitable and business basis. 

3d. To secure hotel accommodations commensurate with 
the price paid, and to adjust all complaints against hotels, or 
by them against commercial travelers. 

4th. To elevate the social and moral character of com- 
mercial travelers as a profession, and to bring about the bet- 
ter acquaintance of members. 

5th. To provide a Death Benefit Fund in case of death 
by accident or from natural causes. 

Benefits 

$5,000 in case of death by accident; $25.00 weekly indem- 
nity for fifty-two weeks in case of accident; $2,500 for loss of 
both legs and arms, and $2,500 for loss of one leg and one 
arm; $1,000 for loss of one arm or one leg; $1,000 for loss of 
one hand and one foot; $5,000 for loss of both eyes and $1,000 
for loss of one eye. 



56 



LOUISVILLE 



*7ifH? J^eoiie flotela- 



IXCdKI'ORATED 



PIKE CAMPBELL, Manager. 
RATES, $2-92 amd S2 50 per day 

515 to 527 Fifth Street, 

The most Centrally Located Hotel in the City IsOClisVl I le, f\ty. 

THE BEST $2.00 HOUSE IN THE CITY. 



I OUISVILLE 
^ HOTEL 



American and 
european plan. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Thos. A. Mulligan, manager. 





Amtiro@&0) Plauio 



L 



LLE„ IT, 



f^&to §^o®@ ft® m.@@ ®@c* i 



A. R. COOPER, Manager. 



MEMBERS OF TICKET BROKERS' ASSOCIATION. 

W. L. Solomon & Co. 

R. R. Ticket Brokers and 
Commissioned Agents 

77 Clark Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



REDUCED RATES TO ALL POINTS IN THE U. S. 



Passengers contemplating a trip via Chicago, either North, Hast, South or 
West, will do well to purchase tickets as far as Chicago ONLY. 
On arrival in Chicago, call at our office and we will guar- 
antee to save you from $1.00 to $20.00 
on balance of ticket. 



Remember the Number 

77 Clark Street. 



CHICAGO 



Telephone Slain 209.1 



.aaa; 



^LJ^ 



Wj>. 




^33 




5S" 




CUflfiEflT YEAR 




The Association is now organized in 32 states and in q8 
large cities of the United States. It is the only National 
Commercial Association in the United States, and so 
thoroughly, compactly and cohesively organized as to 
promptly and effectively respond for the protection and pro- 
motion of commercial interests, while at the same time it 
maintains an autonomy and individuality of action in State 
Division and local posts. 

It is a commercial travelers" organization, but has for 
members employers of commercial travelers among whole- 
sale dealers and manufacturers, and this combination gives 
it a powerful influence. 

It is organized upon the Federal plan, as already men- 
tioned, having National, State and Municipal Governments, 
and its five general committees on legislation, railroads, 
hotels, press and employment, are represented in each of the 
state and municipal organizations, thereby co-operating 
systematically and with great discipline of effort in this work 
for the interest of its members and general benefit of com- 
mercial operations. 

From the late report of the National President, Mr. 
John A. Lee, after referring to the amendment of the Inter- 
State Commerce Act and the effective action of the Travelers' 
Protective Association in that behalf, it is shown that through 
its accident insurance department more than $57,000 indem- 



nity claims have been paid during the last year, in which six 
death losses are included. 

The total expense of conducting the Association is only 
about 10 per cent, more than last year, while the average 
membership has nearly doubled. The per capita expense 
allowed by the constitution is $2.00 per average membership, 
but only $1.77 was expended, being a saving of $i.c6 per 
capita as compared with the previous year, and a surplus of 
nearly $2,000 was saved from the expense account. Almost 
the entire increase in expenditures over last year was in the 
postage account, extra office help and identification system 
which was already fixed and unavoidable. 

During the year two new State Divisions have been or- 
ganized, one in Florida and one in North Carolina. Twenty- 
nine new Posts have also been established, and during that 
time only three have lapsed. The expenditures for indem- 
nities have been larger than ever before in the history of the 
Association. An amendment to the constitution was effected 
to establish a membership or initiation fee of $2.00, of that 
amount $1.00 is placed to the credit of the indemnity fund, 
50 cents to the State division, and 50 cents to the local post. 
The total cost of conducting the Association, exclusive of in- 
demnities and benefits was $15,627 for the current year, as is 
usual with other Associations of like character, the expense 
per capita would be only $1.46, an eminently satisfactory 
showing:. 



58 



LOUISVILLE 



HEMRY 
PILCHERS 
50M5 

PIPE ORGANS 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



•:••:• 



SUPERIORITY IN TONE 
riECHANISM 
AND DESIGN 



ESTABLISHED 1871 

Soulliern (licvir 

Manufactory 

FRED WEIKEL, Proprietor 

MANUFACTURER OF 

CANE 

UPHOLSTERED 
AND 
COBBLER SEAT 
CHAIRS 
AND 
ROCKERS 

Factory and Warerooms 
S. E. Cor. Ninth and York Streets 

Opp. Nashville R. K. Depot 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



The 

Blum Art Glass 

Company 



ORNAMENTAL GLASS 
METALLIC SASH 
BEVELED GLASS 
MIRRORS. 
MEMORIAL AND 
FIGURE WINDOWS 



NC. 2II WEST GREEN STREET 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
A. I.. DUCKED G. I'. BORNTRAEGEH 

TELEPHONE 1 391 

KENTUCKY WIRE 
WORKS 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Office Railings, Wire Fences, Settees 
Flower Pot Stands 
Window Guards 
Grate Guards 
Nursery Fenders 
Tree Boxes, Floral Designs 
Sand Screens 
Lamp Shade Frames 
Etc. 

All kinds of Wire 
Cloth made to order 



NOS. 644-646 BROOK STREET 

BET. MADISON AND CHESTNUT 



CHAS. STOECKER 

Tanner of 

PURE OAK 

TANNED 

HAND STUFFED 

HARNESS 

SKIRTING 

COLLAR 

LEATHER 

AND HOGS 

SKINS 



No. 1637 Story 
Avenue 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Hettermann 
Bros. 




CIGAR 



MANUFACTURERS 



1322 Floyd 
Street 
Louisville, Ky. 



Frank A. 
Menne 
Candy 
Co. 



INCORPORATED 



iBBB&Bmwm. 

■-<■ — ■.. • - : ■ ■ 



ROWAN STREET 

Louisville, Ky, 



MEMBER GUARANTEE TICKET BROKER S 
ASSOCIATION 



Railroad and Steam 
Boat Ticket 
Office 



TICKETS BOUGHT, SOLD AND 
EXCHANGED 



D. S. BROWN 

215 FOURTH AVE. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



NOTE— Before perchasing tickets call 
or Telephone me and I will save you 
from Si. 00 to $20.00. 



TELEPHONE 16 



59 



PADQCAM ClTq 



This city, the judicial seat of McCracken county, and 
the metropolis of "Jackson's Purchase," is situated on the 
( )hio river, at the mouth of the Tennessee river, and 12 miles 
from the mouth of 
the Cumberland, on 
the C. (). & S. W. 
division of the X. N. 
& M. V. Ry. It is 
also the northern ter- 
minus of the Padu- 
cah, Ten nessee & 
Alabama Ry. It is 
also the southern ter- 
minus of the St. 
Louis, Alton t \; 
Terre Haute Ry., 
commonly known as 
t h e "Cairo Short 
Line," making- direct 
communication with 
Chicago a n d St. 
Louis. The city was 
incorporated in 1856, 
re-incorporated in 1872, and ranks as the fifth in the State in 
population, but is probably the third in business importance 
and enterprise. It has electric and horse street cars, gas 
and water works. The wholesale trade is very large, and 
includes dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, whisky, 
queensware, and numerous others. There are several ex- 




BROADWAY LOOKING EAST FROM FIFTH ST. 



tensive tobacco commission houses (whose annual sales 
amount to many thousand hogsheads), leaf tobacco stem- 
meries, Hour mills, machine shops, and foundries, beside 

the railroad repair 
shops, carriage a n d 
w a g o n factories, a 
hub and spoke fac- 
tory, a furniture fac- 
tory, a stave factory, 
two saw mills, a ta n 
nery, and an ice fac- 
tory. Besides these, 
there are two daily 
a n d three weekly 
newspapers, five ho- 
tels and five banks, a 
college, a splendid 
public school system, 
a high school and a 
goodly number of 
churches. The city is 
the terminus of four 
packet lines from 
Evansville, Cairo, Florence (Alabama) and Nashville, thus 
affording most excellent shipping facilities. There are a 
number of handsome business block.-, and private residences, 
and altogether it is one of the most prosperous cities in the 
Southwest. Population, 23,000. Exp., Southern and Adams. 
Tel., W. U. 



60 



PADUCAII 



% 






reyfufs 4 



Mm»m 



^ — ^ 



Dilfif/ers 



mSm 



^552^!dWALEP)s"S 




!2P fl Secondjt" 

pADUCAH, KY 






61 




Owing- to her size in population and commercial advant- 
ages she commands supremacy oxer the adjacent country 
for a radius of many miles. Nestled like a diamond amid 
the emerald hued forests of the surrounding hills, rich with 
timber of commerce which furnishes the crude material for 
the superior goods of her manufactories, she has the waters 
of the Tennessee, the Cumberland and the Ohio at her 
feet, monster highways of 
trade, upon the bosoms of 
which glide barges of com- 
merce richly laden with the 
coal which is excavated at her 
very door, the iron ores dug 
within sight of her naked eye, 
and the hard woods with 
which she challenges the 
world to equal. Is this not a 
tempting sight to the prospec- 
tive manufacturer ? A perfect 
checker board these streets, 
and as level, from the squares 
of which arises the lofty spires 
of God's trysting places, sur- 
rounded by the peaceful roofs 
of the contented inhabitants ; 
while swiftly glide in every 
direction cars of that unseen, subtle power, electricity. 

' Those plain and spacious structures are owned by the 
many wholesale and tobacco warehouse interests in which 
Paducah abounds. Some are nestled close to the iron tracks 
while others find a compromise between the steam roads and 
the river-ways. Those towering piles, belching forth grim 



PADUCAH 

substance which forms a veil over the sun, mark where manu- 
factories, taking advantage of the resources of coal, iron and 
timber with which the surrounding country abounds, shape 
the staple products which add to the reputation of Paducah 
as a producing point. Observe what modern business blocks, 
what pride the merchants take in displaying their wares in 
the show windows of which plate glass is the rule; what ad- 
mirably constructed streets, 
lined with miles of brick side- 
walks, canopied with gracious 
shade trees. Noticeable is the 
care taken of the residence 
lawns, studded with flower 
beds and ornaments, indicat- 
ing the pride in home which 
every prosperous and wealthy 
community. Behold the fifth 
city in the state, the fourth 
largest tobacco market in the 
Union, and one of the few 
cities which can boast of not 
having a failure during the 
recent financial depression." 
Tradition has it that her 
name was given in memory 
of an Indian chief whose re- 
mains lie buried on her site. The original plat of Paducah 
was made and the town laid out May 26, 1827; on May 2, 1831, 
the first election for trustees was held; but not until March 
10, 1856, was it incorporated as a city. 

It would be hard to imagine a site more favorable for the 
building of an ideal city than that possessed by Paducah. 
62 




CITY HALL 



rmjcm 



E. P. Gilson & Co 




Wholesale 




rS^- 



Paints.... 

Oils...Varnishes 



Painters' 
and Artists' 
Materials 



Brushes and 

Window Glass 




4.IO Broadway. 



PADUCAH KENTUCKY 



63 



P A I ) I 

Elevated above the Ohio river she lies on a plain unbroken 
by any abruptions and sweeping smooth and level back to 
the hills five miles away. A slight natural elevation affords 
abundant natural drainage. No city on the continent can 
boast such straight streets, laid out at right angles and paved 
with gravel, thus affording the most enjoyable driving. Abun- 
dant shade, well kept lawns, profuse with flowers, charm the 
eye and senses. In architecture the city is not behind the 
times. Modern business blocks and residences are visible 
everywhere, as evidence of which a glance through these 
pages will suffice. The progress of improvement has been 
thwarted from time to time by disasters of fire and storm, but 
the elements were not so cruel as the catastrophe of war, at 
the close of which most of the city had been reduced to 
ashes and her most useful buildings bombarded into frag- 
ments. Arising above these obstacles the Paducah of today 
claims a population of 23,000, and stands more proudly than 
ever, bidding the stranger welcome to the beauties of her in- 
dustry, wealth and enterprise. Located on the great Ohio, 
just at the mouth of the Tennessee, and a few miles south of 
the mouth of the Cumberland, with the grand old Mississippi 
only fifty miles away; what better river shipping facilities 
could be arranged? Transportation by rail is affected by 
three lines, the Newport News and Mississippi Valley, form- 
ing a continuous line from Chesapeake Bay to California, the 
St. Louis and Paducah Railroad, leading to the Great North- 
west, and the Paducah, Tennessee and Alabama, connecting 
at Hollow Rock with the Louisville and Nashville. By river, 
boats ply the Ohio, Tennessee and Cumberland rivers the 
year around, and competition between boat and rail makes 
freight rates very low. 



CAH 

WHOLESALE INTERESTS 

The wholesale interests of Paducah are represented by 
about fifty firms, which speak volumes for the enterprise and 
thrift of a town of only 23,000 inhabitants. The shipping 
facilities are so favorable, however, and the country con- 
tiguous is so well settled with flourishing communities that 
the opportunities are especially propitious for the jobbing of 
all kinds of goods. About 200 traveling men represent the 
jobbing interests of Paducah on the road. The railroad and 
river carriers make sharp competition in freight rates, and the 
favorable position of Paducah enables these two agencies to 
send their freights in all directions at an advantage over all 
other points in competition. The individual review of each 
of the following wholesale interests will give a good idea of 
the immense volume of jobbing done at this point. 

THE TOBACCO INDUSTRY 

The casual observer of Paducah's points of commercial 
worth would little think that modesty quartered in different 
parts of the business section of twenty or more severely 
business-like looking men are pulling and tugging through 
wire and mail at the great tobacco markets of the world. 
Owing to the push and enterprise of these workers in ware- 
house, office and field, Paducah holds place as the second 
largest tobacco market in Kentucky, a state known to be the 
largest producer of tobacco in in the world, growing nearly 
half of all the tobacco raised in the United States. Of the 
exclusively dark tobacco markets of the state Paducah holds 
first place. In the tobacco circles of the country this is not 
only conceded for Paducah but regarded enviously, and if 
possible by fair means or trick of trade to wrench from her 



64 



I'.vnucAii 



l?e J^oyd-WI^ite epHVate ^or^ieal Hospital and Infi^ma^y 

^elected at padaea^ ky tl^e S. p. j5. a^> t^e Infipmapy Fop ih^ ylennlBer^ 




This institution is fully equipped and has better furnishings than any similar institution in the state, 
nurses in constant attendance, located Corner Broadway and Sixth Street, one block from Palmer House. 
Reference — F. E. LACK, State Sec'y. Kentucky Division T. P. A. and other state officers. 

&5 



Two trained 



PADUCAH 



the laurels of her position Paducah competitors would have 
distanced her in the struggle of the past decade. As an in- 
spection market for dark tobacco, Paducah today stands in 
the front ranks. Louisville and Cincinnati have both flour- 
ished under the patronage of the Burley growers, but have 
almost completely lost out on dark tobacco. The question 
of supremacy for sales of dark, heavy tobacco seems to have 
narrowed down to a race between Paducah and Clarksville. 
This competitor, however, must stay on her side of the fence 
or Paducah will be provoked to despoil her of some of her 
treasured business. Transactions in Paducah have been car- 
ried on with conservatism characteristic of Kentuckians, and 
the vicissitudes of trade that have overtaken some more 
southern markets have not been experienced here. Spirit 
and snap, conceded to be the effervescence of business, do 
not amount to much, however, when it comes to dealing with 



the cool and calculating blood of Northern Europe, and 
hence the advantage that accrues to Paducah's conservatism. 
Foreign buyers have learned by experience to depend upon 
the honesty of Paducah's inspection. 

There is no doubt that the tobacco interests must be 
credited with having been the backbone that carried Paducah 
through the recent financial distress with the proud record of 
not having sustained a single commercial failure, bringing to 
the local banks each week during the active part of the sea- 
son from fifty to seventy-five thousand dollars worth of 
European money. There are six warehouse structures in 
Paducah, valued from $90,000 to $100,000, and with an aggre- 
gate storage capacity of 15,000 hogsheads. 






NOTE — The author of this sketch desires to make his acknowledgments to Messrs Dil- 
day & Van Senden for the use of their souvenir, d;ited 1K04, which contains much useful 
historical information. 




p\nrc M' 



iMmWMttMMI 



THE 

QUEEN 8, 
* CRESCENT s 

ROUTE 

Vestibuled Limited Trains 
to Southern Towns 
and Gties. A fine trip 
for summer outing through 
the Blue Grass region, the 
great Cumberland Plateau 
and to far famed 
Lookout Mountain. 
The historic battlefields of 
CHICKAMAUGA, 
Mission Ridge and 
LOOKOUT 
MOUNT.MN. 
Cool and invigorating air, 
unequaled scenery, 
good hotels. 

Low reduced rates via the Queen 
& Crescent Route now on sale from 
cities and villages of the North. 

Write to AV. C. Rinearson, Gen'l 
Pass'r Agent, Cincinnati, for illus- 
trated and descriptive matter. 





PAbMCR 



OPPOSITE 

POST 

OFFICE 



CHARLES REED 

PR0PRIET9R 



HOUSE 




PASSENGER 
EL2EVAT0R. 

Heated by 

STEAM 



Rates $2.00, $2.50, 53.00 



PAD8GAH 
KY. 



67 



Kentueky Division 



OF THE 



Travelers Protective Association of America 

****•••••*•*****•**•**** 




OST "A," AT PADUCAH is a wide awake 
and hustling organization that we like to put 

i)'\ JL_ forward as representative of this city. This 

Post which has drawn together nearly 300 
members in less than three years, was organ- 
ized on July 29th, 1893, with nearly thirty 
members. 
This is but one detachment in that grand army of 
commercial travelers, numbering hundreds of thousands, 
whose members are dropping from every train that stops at 
every town in the United States, armed with anything from 
a grip to a dray lull of trunks. 

They dispense samples and goods, information and 
good cheer from ocean to ocean and from the Canadas to 
the * .nil with unflagging zeal and industry, and as among 
them the spirit of true "comaraderie" is found it was verj 
natural that the Travelers' Protective Association should 
spring up for mutual protection and organized union. 

The Paducah Post has one of the handsomest head- 



quarters in the country. It is situated one block from the 
Post office and Palmer House, on Broadway between Fourth 
and Fifth streets. 

There the Post assembles on the second Saturday of 
each month. 

Post A also has a side degree, "which, however, is not 
compulsory," but affords a great deal of amusement and 
pleasure to those who are members, and with occasional 
banquets, etc., it helps to pass main- enjoyable evenings dur- 
ing the summer and winter months. 

Among the members of Post A are included main- of 
Paducah's leading business men who do more, as they travel 
over the country, to sound the praises of Paducah and extend 
its business connections than car loads of reading matter 
ever could. 

With natural pride in the city of their post and in their 
organization, they extend to all T. P. A.'s and commercial 
travelers a cordial invitation to visit their rooms when in 
the city. 



OS 



J. T. CLEMENTS 



I'ADl'CAI 

R. W. CLEMENTS 



J. H. CLEHENTS 



CLEMENTS 
BROS. 



♦♦Lumber 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



SASH, DOORS 

BLIiiDS 

ttOULDIiiGS 



LONG STEAMBOAT LUMBER 
A SPECIALTY 



•/. •.". 



GEO. C. WALLACE 

D. J. GREGORY 

O. L. GREGORY 



MEYERS STREET 



PftDUGflH, KY. 



WALLACE 

AftD GREGORY 
BROS — 



SUCCESSORS TO 

JOS L FRIEDMAtt & CO. 




VINEGARS 

T^ I* llr feS» <^* «^* «^* «cl* «^» «^» «^» <s£ 

GIBERS^ 



PADUCAH. KEttTUCKY 



69 



Kentucky State Officers, T. P. A. of A. 



H. L. Weil. President (Dreyfuss & Weil). Paducah, Ky 

V. II. Englehart, ist Vice-President < Engelhart & Son). Louisville, Ky. 
J. Gilmour, 2d Vice-President (J. Gilmour), Owensboro, Ky. 

J as. P. Smith, 3d Vice-President. Paducah, Ky. 

G. L. Si.noN,4th Vice-President. Louisville. Ky. 
J. S. Dams, Paducah. Ky. 

F. E. Lack, Sec. and Trcas. ( E. P. ( iilson & Co. ), Paducah, Ky. 

BOARD Or DIRECTORS 
J. A. Bryant, (J. R. Smith & Co.). Paducah. Ky. 
L. F. Kolbj I)u Bois& Co.), Paducah, Ky 
W. [. LEVY, Paducah. Ky. 

P. Lackey, Paducah, Ky. 

A. R. Grouse, Paducah, Ky. 

Chairman Hotel Committee W. J. Abraham, Louisville, Ky. 
Chairman Press Committee H. Tandy, Paducah, Ky. 
Chairman Railroad Committee II. II. Beckmann, Louisville. Ky. 
Chairman Legislative Committee—). S. Look. Paducah, Ky 



PADUCAH 



Growers of Choice Cut Telephone is? 

" Rowland Place 



G. L. BrURSOB &, GO. F'owers and Plants 



Paducah, Ky. 



T.A.BAUER 



MANUFACTURER OF 



STONEWARE, FRUIT JARS 

FLOWER POTS. ETC. 




GARDEN AND FLOWER 
VASES 



CORNER 7th AND TRIMBLE 
STREETS 



PADUCAH, KY. 



JOHN GILBERT, President 



J. H. FOWLER, Superintendent 



G. O. CRUMBAUGH Secretary 

S. A. FOWLER, Gen'l Freight Agent 



EVANSVILLE, PADUCAH AHO CAIRO PACKET LINE 



OPERATED BY 



Tennessee and Ohio River Transportation 

Company 



I 



i 






■3tm 



■ii- 



iiuiittfiFiaKiilVriWSs 




GENERAL OFFICES, PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 



Leaves Evansville for Paducah 4:30 p. m. 

Leaves Paducah for Evansville 10:00 a. m. 

Leaves Paducah for Cairo 8:00 a. m. 
Leaves 1 lairo for Paducah 5:00 p. in. 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 



7' 



LflB0RSS60MM&R6lfll_ TRAVELERS 




•A**************************** 



\ the life-work of the commercial traveler 
there are two features deserving of con- 
sideration. One involves the character 
and importance of his labor, the other his 
sacrifii es and compensations. 
I 'l>on his energy and ability the fortunes of the largest 
as well as the less prominent, mercantile and manufacturing 
enterprises rest. He is their trusted and most responsible 
representative. He goes forth to build up and maintain the 
-ivat business operations of those whom he represents. He 
directs the llow of-a thousand steams of trade to. a central 
point, without which the business interests of Ins employers 
would languish. He touches new fields of trade, and they 
become sources of great profit to the merchant, who -its m 
his luxurious office and directs the movements of his repres- 
entatives, lie must be a man of special qualifications, accur- 
ate and quick judgment, unconquerable energy, always genial 
and engaging in his manner, whether overtaken by disaster 
or encouraged by success. 

He may be the representative of a single establishment 

only, and vet he is the most valuable factor in the trade of a 
whole city; because he is practically the agent of every in- 
dustry and every merchant in it. It is not sufficient that his 
knowledge should only extend to the line of goods in winch 
he deals, but he must be informed upon every subject relating 
to the city he represents. 

To accomplish all this the commercial traveler makes 
great sacrifices. EJe surrenders the large portion of hi. home 



life and- leaves his wife, and children to depend upon others 
for social enjoyment. He sends them his love and salary, 
but is seldom with them to enjoy the -real and inestimable 
privileges of his family circle. At all seasons of the year, 
whether in sunshine or in storm, he must be on the alert, and 
in addition to his samples he must bear the constant burden 
ol care and responsibility. 

fo travel almost without ceasing*— sometimes in fine 
railway carriages, then upon freight trains; often in stages 
and again on horseback or in open conveyances, at all times 
"I day and night; then hurrying from the tram to a good or 
indifferent hotel, sleeping and eating with a rush, making 
calls on customers, and either in sickness or health, travel- 
worn, tired, depressed or hopeful, be the same genial, cordial 
gentleman always are among the sacrifices that shorten the 
active lives of commercial travelers. If discouragement or 
disappointment overtakes him he must not show it. If his 
wife or any of his little ones are ill. he must press the sad 
news back to his heart, because commerce and trade demand 
hi- best efforts. 

These are some of the experiences of the commercial 
traveler in building fortunes for the enjoyment of others, 
while at the end of his career his salary ami percentages have 
usually been absorbed for the support of his family. His 
< ompensation has been inadequate to provide for the future. 
In advancing age or in case of death, his condition appeals 
strongly to those who have been enriched and are surrounded 
with comforts and luxuries through his labors. 



<il-:o. o. HART, Presidenl 

H. it. hank. Secretarj 

QEO. B. HART. V-I>res't and Treas. 



Geo. O. Hart & Son 
Hardware 



and Stove 
Co. 



INCORPORATED 



JOBBERS OF 

Hardware. Iron and 
Stoves 
Tinware 

and Blacksmiths 
Material 



303-305-307 
North 
liroadway PADUCAH, KY. 



THE FORKED DEER 
TOBACCO J&L, 
WORKS 




Smith & Scott 



MANUFACTURERS OFTME 
CCLC8RATE0 

•FORKED-DEER"and "PRIDE OF 
DIXIE" TOBACCOS 

PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 



<iF:<>. C. THOHPSON, Presidenl 

EI). L. ATKINS, Cashier 



MAD! (All 

M HLOOM, Presidenl 



THE 

AMERICAN 

GERMAN 

NATIONAL 

BANK 



PADUCAH 

KENTUCKY 



ELBRIDGE PALMER 
E. E. BELL 



Oliio^iver Spoke 
M I^im (°mp&ny 

MANUFACTURERS. OF 

WHEEL 

MATERIAL 

Club turned I [ickory 
Spokes ami 
Sawed I lickory Kim 
Strips 
A Specialty 

PADUCAH, KY. 



T. I. ATKINS. Treasurer 



W.M. BORNEMAJNN, Secretary 



Paducah Ice 



Company 



INCORPORATED 



Daily Ice making capacity, 75 tons 

Daily Cold storage capacity, 30 tons 



Ice made oi distilled river water and in tanks 
weighing 106-108 lbs. 



fevn^foff-Orm 



GEO. LANGSTAFF, |k., President 
II M. Or.M, Vice President 
< ', 1 , 1. Langstaiu', Sec'y 
II. W, Rankin, Treasurer 



i^nuf&durin^ 
Co. 



INCORPORATED 



MANUFACTURHRS OF 




LUMBER.. 

Sash, Doors, Blinds 

Long Steamboat Lumber 



■ CAT THIS AND TARE THl MORN*. IO.BTI FT OF 
INCH MOPL,R BOARDS CUT IN ol'.' MINUTIS BY ONE 
To INCH OIHCULAR SAW ON MAY IB. 1BTT 



No. 438 South Second 
Street 



A Specialty 



PADUCAH, KENTUCKY 






LEXINGTON 





HIS enter™ and beautifu, clt ,„,, cll „ ^ rf ^ ^ ^ y ^ ^ ^ 
•he natural depot for the immense resources - Woman Triumphant : » an opera house „„„ t a, a cos, ,„ 

.1 Centraland Jastern Kentucky, is located $50,000, with a seating capacity of , ano • , „ 

■ ">. ajj.u u\ o\ 1,400, a new government 

building andpostoffice at a cost of $130,000. 



on the town fork of Elkhorn 
river, in Fayette County, of 
|o win, h it is the judicial scat, 04 
O m »es east oi Louisville and 
~k e^ 79 from Covington, and pre- 
sents an extremely attractive appearance, 
its streets being broad and well paved and 
studded with handsome business blocks 
and private residences. The city has never 
been more progressive and alive than at 
present; street railways, telephones, elec- 




Natiiral Bridge, Kentucky, on Lexington & 
Eastern Railway. 



It 1- especially celebrated for its educa- 
tional institutions, foremost among which 
are the Kentucky University, the State 
College of Kentucky, Sayre Female In- 
stitute, St. Catherines Academy, Hamilton 
Female College, 5 public school buildings 
for whites and 4 for colored. The remains 
of main- of the most illustrious men of the 
State are interred in the cemetery here. 



which is one oi the most beautiful in the 
trie lights, electric street cars, electric patrol and messenger I mted St„ 1 c 

■ , l mh(l btates - a nd a fine monument erected in memorj of 

service, also a free mail delivery and chamber of commerce 11,-m-v.i ,1 

mmerce. Henry Clay, the eminent statesman, is here. Eighteen white 

rhere ^«^agn,ficentcourthouse,whichcost$i50,ooo,in the churches and „ ,. . 

enureses and 13 colored, representing the various religious 



_ 



i.r.xTxr.TON 



PHOENIX 

HO*E& 



QMflS. SEELPflQM 



LEXINGTON 

KENTUCKY 






. jar "* , 



the 

commercial 
travelers 
headquarters 



AND ONE OF THE BEST HOTELS IN THE 
SOUTH AN I) Till- ONLY STRICTLY 
FIRST-CLASS ONE IN 
LEXINGTON 



RATES 

#3.5© AND $3.00 

PER DAY AND SPECIAL RATES 



LEXINGTON 



denominations, arc sustained. The city contains 12 banks 
and 2safety vault trust companies; g newspapers, viz.: Tran- 
script (daily and weekly), Press (daily and weekly), Leader 
( daily and weekly >, Gazette ( semi-weekly and weekly >. Live 
Stink Record, Stock Farm, Blue Grass Blade, Trades Jour- 
nal, Kentucky Soldier, and four college papers. Its railroad 
facilities are unsurpassed, the following lines centering here 
and radiating to all points: Kentucky Central, Maysville 
branch of Kentucky Central, Cincinnati Southern, Louisville 
Southern, Kentucky I 'nion, Newport News & Mississippi 
Valley, Louisville & Nashville, and Electric Belt Line. 
Lexington claims one of the most successful agricultural and 



mechanical associations in the State. At its annual fairs, 
which are held the last Tuesday in August, the displays of 
Kentucky products of all descriptions arc superb, and the 
exhibition of tine livestock, for which the Blue- Grass region 
is so celebrated, cannot be surpassed. The Kentucky Asso- 
ciarion, being the oldest racing association in the West, holds 
spring and fall meetings; the Kentucky Trotting Horse 
Breeders' Association also having fall meetings. The annual 
sales of horses in Lexington will aggregate two million dol- 
lars. Express, Adams and United States. Telegraph, 
Western I nion. Population, 40,000. 



I 




.EXINGTON 



^ 



X1INOTON 

STEHtf 



o o o o o c 



J, ft WlLU^nS PROF. 



1 



-f 



<p 



a* 





^fe 








k^Mk 



m^ j ^r^ 




■ & 








\er)th^y 


^lean)^"^ 


L>a£ir)dpy 


MMptor) & (L.M>ppen, p'ips. 



77 



National Officers T. P. A. of A. .„ 1895=96 



John A. Lee, President. St. Louis, Mo. 

Louis T. LaBeaume, Secretary and Treasurer, St. Louis, Mo. 
Joseph Wallerstein, 1st Vice-President, Richmond. \'a. 
A. E. McKenzie, 2d Vice-President, Denver, Colo. 

L. C. Cardinal, 3d Vice-President, Montgomery, Ala. 

Ciias. W. Jacobs, 4th Vice-President, Nashville, Tenn. 

Geo. F. Burchard, 5th Vice-President, Little Rock. Ark 

NATIONAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Cari. M. ALDRICH, Peoria. 111. 

N. E. Hu<;ni:s. Memphis, Tenn. 

John J. Knight, Dallas, Tex. 

George P. Heckel, St. Louis, Mo. 

C. II. WlCKARD, St. Louis, Mo. 

W. A. Kirchhoff, St. Louis, Mo. 
Chairman National Railroad Committee— Neil McCoull, 60 Wabash Ave.. Chicago, 111 

Chairman National-Hotel Committee— \\v.\\. F. Hoffmann, Lafayette, Ind. 
Chairman National Legislative Committee— J ohn S. Harwood, iooi Can St., Richmond, Va. 
Chairman National Press Committee -J. M. Benish, Houston, Tex. 
Chairman National Employment Committee— J . C. Simering, 1536 Harlem Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Auditing Committee E. L. Higdon, Birmingham, Ala. 

Frank II. Putnam, Peoria, 111. 
Samuel Friedberg, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Chaplain— Rkw Alonzo Monk, Macon, Ga. 
Attorney— Henry T. Kent, St. Louis. Mo. 

National Headquarters St. Louis, Mo. 

' 8 



ESTABLISHETI 1TBO 



VV A K/N l/N VT7 : Bewara of fraudulent Imitations and Refilled 
Bottles. All genuine Distillery Bottling of 

^VOLD PEPPER WHISKEY --VH-. 

which is guaranteed absolutely the purest and best in the world, bears the 
following unbroken signature on the "JAS. E. PEPPER & CO " 
back Caution Label and across the ' Dividers ami Botiier*. 

stopper LEXINGTON, KY. 

Jamrs E. Pepper, is the only one bearing the name, who has been en- 
gaged in the distillery business, in this country for more than 2=, years. 

A HINT TO THE WISE IS SUFFICIENT. 



OLD ELK 



LEXINGTON 

Lfexin^Ion Hi Extern I^ilw&y Qo. 

President H. C. MCDOWELL 

Vice l'res. and Gen'l Manager J. IX LIVINGSTON 

Secretarv and Gen'l Solicitor ARTHUR CARV 

Treasurer and Auditor GEO. COPLAND 

Gen'l Passenger and Freight Agent CHAS. SCOTT 

General Offices, LEXINGTON, Kg. 

The Ideal Mountain Route of Kentucky 



Stoll, Vannatta & Co. 



INCORPORATED 

^DISTILLGRS-^ 



Lexington, 



Kentucky. 



l_e:l_amd hotel 



*•*•••**•*•*** 



Mm 

1 wo Squares 
from Depots Ji 



****•**•*•**** 




****•*****•*•• 

On Street 

Car Line 

•••*****•••*•* 



LLXINCTON. KY 



Only Hotel 

in the Citv with 



?verv room 



STEAM HEAT- 

Passenger Elevator 



Large Sample Rooms 
Commercial Kates $2.00 



J. . v \. SKA IN. Prop. 

FnnncrH whli Phoenix Hotel 




NATURAL BRIDGE, 

TORRENT, 

GRAINING BLOCK CANON 

AND 

FORKS OF KENTUCKY RIVER 
are unexcelled for grandure °f scenery. 



J. Will. Mcl'ormick 



W. R. Cockrell 



J. M. McCormick 



LEAinoion Lumber § TlnnumauKinQ Co. 

Manufacturers and Dealers In 

though and Dressed Liumbet* 

Yard, Office and Factory 

32T East Main St., at <Z. Sn O. "R. "R. erossing. 

PHONE 156. 



79 



jfranltfort 




Capital of the Blue Grass State 

S the scat of government of the State of Kentucky, and is situated on 
the north and south sides of the Kentucky river, in Franklin county, 
65 miles from Louisville. It is upon the branch line of the Louisville 
& Nashville Railroad to Lexington, and is the western terminus of 
the Kentucky Midland Railway, completed to Paris, and to be con- 
tinued to Virginia connections. By these lines it has easy and fre- 
quent connection with the great trunk lines to the north, east and south. The Ken- 
tucky river is navigable to points far above Frankfort, and regular lines of steamers 
ply its waters, carrying both freight and passengers. The population, according to 
the census of 1895, was 12,200. There are 6 banks, 2 daily and 3 weekly newspapers, 
10 elegant church buildings, excellent public schools for white and colored pupils, 
numerous first-class private schools, and a State Normal School for the training" of 
colored teachers. The business of the city, while principally of a retail character, is 
large, and conducted by men of public spirit and energy. In the vicinity are several 
stock farms, from which have come some of the fastest trotters on the turf, and the 
stables of which contain some of the best blooded horses in the State. The manu- 
facturing industries are varied and extensive, and a large trade is done with the 
surrounding country. Exp., Adams and U. S. Tel., W. U. Telephone communi- 
cation. 



FRANKFORT 




Best 
Flour 
in 
America 



MADE FROM 



^^^__ 



Selected Winter Wheat 



MILAM'S REEL BE 




In use by thousands of leading 
sportsmen. Perfect in construc- 
tion, elegant In appearance, and 

must durable in the world. 



The Standard for Sixty years. 

B. C. MILAM & SON, 

FRANKFORT, KY. 



Write Direct to= 



■® 



The 

Geo. f . Stacjcj 

£omp&r?y 



FOR 

O. F. C. 
WHISKY 



Frankfort, ljy. 



KENTOGKY niBLAND 
RAILWAY 

Frankfort, Kentucky. 






Connects at Georgetown for Cincinnati. 
Connects at Georgetown for Lexington and the South. 
Connects at Georgetown for Versailles and Shelbyville. 
Connects at Paris for Winchester and Richmond. 
Connects at Paris for Maysville. 

C. D. BERCAW, G. p. a. 



Si 



<&tomrfboni 




HE northern terminus of the O. & L. Ry., on the L., St. L. & T.. 
and ()., F. of K. & G. R. R. Ky's located on the Ohio river, 150 
miles below Louisville. Was selected as the county seat of Daviess 
county tn 181s, and named in honor of Col. Ahrani Owen, one of the early pioneers 
of this section. This city is beautifully laid out, and contains some hnc business 
blocks and private residences, and is lighted by gas. The Westinghouse electric 
light is also in use here. Water works on the Holly system. Amongthe features of the 
place are 3 hotels, 3 daily and weekly newspapers, g banks, 15 churches, good schools 
(high and normal), flour mills, several carriage and wagon shops, brick yards, a 
foundry and machine shop, planing and saw mills, a handle factory, iq distilleries 
in the county manufacture 500 barrels per day. The tobacco interest is large, many 
stemmeries being in operation here and 18,000,000 pounds being shipped annually. 
Coal and iron are mined, and valuable marble quarries are being profitably worked 
in the vicinity. The wholesale trade of tin- city is extensive, this place being the 
supply point for the adjacent country. Bxp., Adams, Southern and U. S. Tel., \\ . 
U. Telephonic communication with surrounding towns. The free delivery system 
is in operation at the postofiice here. Population, 15,000. 





B 
O 




OWENS 


Trade 


R 
O 


M:nk 



JOHN GILMOUR, PREST 




Greenville 



ILM0H^ 

Bros. Bo. 



OWENS !OR() 

Owensboro 
Wagon Co. «« 



INCORPORATED 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF 



PLUBi^TWIST 

TOBAeeo 

OWENSBORO, KY. 



LONG TIME 
...SMOKING 



Guaranteed 3 
years old 



T. A. PEDLEY. PRES 



J G. BURCH , Mr.R 



People's Transfer Co. 

OWENSBORO, KY., 

(Successors to Morgan Hulsey & Co,, and Owensboro Transfer Co. i 

CHECKMEN ON ALL TRAINS ENTERING TNE CITY. 
Hacks and Baggage Wagons meet all Trains. Only Transfer Company in 



Owensboro properly equipped for handling Passengers and Baggage 

SUITABLE RATES 
PAIR TREA 

Telephone 170 



Our Clieckitien iyMIuUmU} furnish you with ruteg. and information 
Keport couiplaiulM direct i" headquarters. 

Office and Stables, 118 E. Third Street. 



EQUITABLE RATES 

FAIR TREATnENT 



I. II. IM< kman, Preat. 

1 W. Bransford, Vice Prenl 

W, A. Steele, Sr< ■> and Mgr 



CORPORATED 
MANUFACTURERS OF 



The "Owensboro" Wagons 

DRAYS AND DUMP CARTS. 



w-ww^ 



r*** 



We want you to stop and think, before buying, of the advantages to be had 
in an "Owensboro" Wagon, it has stood every test, filled every 

requirement and in the lace of the must earnest efforts ot 
all other wagon makers to equal it 

IT STANDS WITHOUT A RIVAL. 

Buy the "Owensboro" Farm Wagon and you are absolutely certain 

to get just what you want. 

Manufactured by Owensboro Wagon Co. 

OWENSBORO, KY. 



"R. Monarch" and 
"Kentucky Club" 




Pare Whiskies. 



_,. HANO'vy flr1 ASH It, 1 ■ 



W&k 



K>, ... •■••• v Jffi» n 



OWtNSBORO KY 



Genuine Only when Bottled in this 
Style Package. 



Put up in Quarts, Pints and One-Half Pints 




Ask your Dealer for these IJrands. If he 
hasn't them, write us 

R. MONARCH BOTTLING CO, 

OWENSBORO, KY. 



»_a_UTmrrrit_ti_r 



f^entortfott 



ffiopkinmilt 



»tF*mswvm 



Kffil IIS flourishing city, the judicial seat ol the nty 

of same name, is situated on the south hank of the 
Ohio river, ten miles south of Evansville, Ind., and mid- 
way between Louisville and Cairo, 111., on the L. & N., 
the L., St. L. & T. and the O. V. Rys, 145 miles from Nash- 
ville, Tenn., 171 from St. Louis, Mo., and is the central point 
in navigation of a number of river routes, among them the 
Ohio, Mississippi, Wabash, Cumberland and Tennessee. It 
is also a point of landing for regular lines of steamers, con- 
necting Cincinnati and Louisville wirth Memphis and New- 
Orleans, as well as for smaller boats, which are constantly 
arriving and departing. There are 16 large stemmeries, a 
carriage and buggy factory, two large hominy and grist 
mills, one planing and two sawmills, an ice factory, a woolen 
mill, two distilleries, foundry and machine shops, two plug 
tobacco factories, a brewery, two brickyards, four banks, 
three newspapers, good hotels, an opera house and one of the 
largest cotton factories in the south, employing 600 hands. 
I he city is lighted with gas and employs a regular police 
force. It has an excellent system of water works, erected at 
a cost of $100,000. The water works and gas works are 
owned by the city, and water and gas are furnished consum- 
ers at the lowest rates, and both are a source of revenue to 
the city. Its public school building cost $55,000, and is com- 
plete in all respects. The great iron bridge over the Ohio 
river is one of the largest of its kind, and is making Hen- 
derson a railroad center, assuring the future prosperity of the 
city. Tel.. \Y. L. ami B. c\; (). Exp., Adams, Southern and 
1 . S. Population, 15,000. 



\mH Christian county, of which it is the judicial seat. 
^F5d I his the largest wheat and tobacco producing county 
m tiie State, and ranks third in point of population. It is on 
the Town or west fork of Little river, extending almost to 
the east fork of the same, a distance of 1 '_. miles. The 
country north contains inexhaustible stores of coal andiron, 
besides large belts of timber. It is a station on the St. L., 
E. & X. line L. ,\- X. R. R., 71 miles from Nashville, Tenn.. 
84 from Evansville, Ind., and 175 from Louisville. The city 
has made rapid progress during the past lew years, and is 
one of the largest tobacco markets in the State. There are 
Q churches, and education is represented by a free graded 
school, a male college and one for females, also one for the 
colored people. The principal manufacturing interests are 
2 flouring mills, 1 planing mill, 2 carriage factories. 1 plow 
and wagon shop. 4 tobacco rehandling houses and 2 stem- 
meries, 4 weekly and 1 daily newspapers, 4 banks, 1 ice fac- 
tory, 1 foundry and a very thorough representation of the 
minor trades and professions. The city has an efficient fire 
department and a gas company. There are 2 hotels here, 
near the business portion of the city. The city is lighted 
with gas. Tel. W. L. Exp., Southern. Population, 7,000. 
John \V. Breathitt, postmaster. 




84 



llliNDHRSON 



ridRSTdLL 

FURNITURE C2 






MANUFACTURERS OF 



«^» «^C •£» <J% 



complete 
line 



Oak Wardrobes 



j " e f Sideboards 



Chiffoniers and 
Kitchen Cupboards 



HENDERSON, KY. 



Equipped with all 
Latest Machinery 



/Nothing but 
First-Class Work 



RKD 



Eclipse haandry 
Dye (Korks 



SeH LAMP & KLEIBE-RE-R 

PROPHI ETORS 



"J AMD 9 S. MAIM 



■Henderson, Ky. 



HOPKINSVILLE 



H 



BEST OF ALL 

SMOKI/NG TOBAeeOS 



ff 




CHEW 



Kentucky Diamond 







TWIST 






CHEWING BRANDS 

Kentucky Diamond Twist, Choice Greenville, Old 

Kentucky Greenville, Ringer Plug, Spokane 

Twist. Ring Leader Twist. 

SMOKING BRANDS— Red Duke. Old Joe. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

nQiMSVILLE TODnCCO HFG. CD. 

■Hopkinsville, Ky. 



FOR SHL6 BY 7SLL JOBB6RS. 



85 



CUhat the T. P. A. has done 




The following are among the achievements of the Travelers Protective Association 



i It has secured a decision in the Supreme Court of the 
United States against the constitutionality oi the so-called 
" I )rummers" License Tax." which was imposed by fifteen 
States, three Territories and the District of Columbia. 

2 It has secured tor members better hotel accommodations, 
with the free privileges of sample rooms, at a reduction 
from genera] rates. 

3 It lias obtained reduced rates from 'bus and transporta- 
tion companies in many States for members. 

4 U has influenced the issuance of a 5.000-mile book by the 
bake Shore, Michigan Southern and Wisconsin Central 
system, good over nearly fifty lines of railway. 

5 It has influenced the issuance of week end tickets from a 
large number of western railway companies, enabling 
members to leave for home Saturday night and return 
Monday morning at one fare for round trip. 

6 It has secured from the Iron Mountain and Cotton Belt 
railroads a concession of \4c, per mile from former mile- 
age rates 

7 A -real many railroads are now issuing 1,000-mile tickets 
at 2c. per mile, owing to the influence of the T. I'. A. 

8 H ha. provided a $5,000 accident insurance policy for 
each of its members, and pays its members $25.00 weekly 



indemnity in case of disability from accident. All its 
benefits being limited to a fixed cost of $10.00 per annum 
to members. 

Q It succeeded in having passed by Congress a bill amend- 
ing the Inter-State Commerce Law, granting railroad 
companies the privilege to allow commercial travelers to 
carry 300 pounds of baggage instead of 150 pounds. 

10 It has succeeded in having passed by Congress a bill 
( 1 1. R. 32Q1 ) amending the Inter-State Commerce Law, 
allowing railroads to place on sale a 5000 mile universal 
interchangeable mileage book at 2c. per mile. This bill 
will save thousands of dollars annually to merchants and 
manufacturers. 



1 1 



It has organized and established thirty-two state divisions 
in thirty-two states, on the federal plan, and is now the 
grandest, most influential, active and enthusiastic body of 
commercial travelers in the world. 

12 Its membership co-operates with all Commercial in- 
terests, and helps to build up the business of every State 
and City in which the Association has an organization. 
It has no interests which are not identical with those of 
the manufacturers, merchants and transportation com- 
panies.